On their sleeves: an interview with The Tunics

Bursting out of the Croydon suburbs three years ago, indie wonderboys The Tunics took the nation by storm with their debut album Somewhere in Somebody’s Heart. A mesh of tangled guitars and teenage daydreams, a  sound instantly compared to the Libertines, riotous gigs and a rock n’ roll reputation to boot, the quartet were tipped for the top, picking up praise from the NME, Guardian and BBC. But as they turn into their twenties with a new found musical maturity, I chatted to frontman Joe Costello  about what to expect from album number two – Dabblers Handbook, released by BMG on March … Continue reading On their sleeves: an interview with The Tunics

Brass Act: The London Horns live

IN the world of Jazz Top Trumps – where every famous collaborator would earn a high-scoring card – the London Horns would have a formidable hand. The group’s frontline brass trio have been seen on stage with the likes of Phil Collins, Quincy Jones, the Brand New Heavies, the James Taylor Quartet, and son-of-Clint, Kyle Eastwood. And to complete a formidable CV, they recently knocked off a world tour with pop princess Kylie Minogue. So the purpose of this not-so-inventively-titled outfit is for the polished session pros to let their hair down, and play what they want for a change … Continue reading Brass Act: The London Horns live

Cropped for TV: Band of Horses at Brixton Academy reviewed

Seattle dreamers Band of Horses are all about size – big beards, big choruses, and an epic panoramic sound. Like a big budget remake of a Hollywood classic, the quintet feed off the classic country-tinged rock of the Seventies and repackage it for the iPhone generation. They’re in good company too – bracketed alongside the retro-meandering of The National, Fleet Foxes and Local Natives. Like all the above, they’re faced with the trouble of translating their bedroom-brooding introspections and shimmering harmonies to a beery crowd. The answer is dumb it down, strip it back, and vamp it up – the … Continue reading Cropped for TV: Band of Horses at Brixton Academy reviewed

R.I.P. Gary Moore: remembering a guitar legend

It was with a heavy heart that I read the news today that Gary Moore has died. I was lucky enough to chat at length with Gary less than two years ago, when he was promoting what will now be remembered as his swan song LP, Bad For You Baby. Of course, he was a phenomenal player, laying down some truly timeless lead guitar; but far more than that, he was a thoroughly nice guy. “Humble” and “down-to-earth” are descriptions you readily hear applied to celebrities and musicians, but in my experience are rarely true. Gary was an exception. Throughout … Continue reading R.I.P. Gary Moore: remembering a guitar legend

Irritation overload: Go Compare’s tenor performing with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra

He is officially the most annoying man in the country. This is no snobby reviewer’s hyperbole. Tenor Wynne Evans is the face of Go Compare’s omnipresent TV ads – recently voted the “most irritating” by audiences for a second year running, infuriating an unprecedented 59 per cent of viewers. Not that he is complaining, with recent reports suggesting he banked £450,000, and a six-figure album deal, off the back of those moustache-twirling antics. Fitting then, that on this evening he was parachuted in to sing O Sole Mio, best known for the Cornetto ad, and Pavarotti-a-thon Nessun Dorma, familiar to … Continue reading Irritation overload: Go Compare’s tenor performing with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra