In loving praise of Björk: Popular music’s most peerless polymath

No mainstream musician has embraced the boundless, barrier-busting 21st century with anything approaching the fever or flair of Björk, a singular sort of talent who makes the divisions between disciplines seem the most flagrant shade of passé. The Icelandic popstar-turned-multidisciplinary auteur is expected to release a new album, Utopia, next month [November], and if previous outings are anything to go by, it will be far more than a mere set of songs. Preparing her ninth studio work, the ethereal polymath has moved squarely beyond the realm of simply recording albums and performing their songs live – her previous two releases … Continue reading In loving praise of Björk: Popular music’s most peerless polymath

Review: Is multi-media blockbuster “experience” Van Gogh Alive really the future of appreciating the Old Masters?

Is this the future of touring blockbuster art exhibitions? That’s the question which springs to mind strolling the shimmering surfaces of Van Gogh Alive – the perplexing “multimedia exhibition experience” currently touring the world, while presenting precisely zero original works … Continue reading Review: Is multi-media blockbuster “experience” Van Gogh Alive really the future of appreciating the Old Masters?

Joni Mitchell: A celebration

This month marks the 50th anniversary of Joni Mitchell’s debut album, Song to a Seagull – a modest, then-overlooked release which subtly sounded the arrival of one of the most singular, influential voices in the history of popular music. A voice we’ve sadly, but almost certainly, heard the last word from. The 74-year-old has released just one LP of new material in the past two decades, and the likelihood of suspending retirement slimmed further after suffering a life-threatening brain aneurysm in 2015. Indeed, Mitchell appeared to voluntarily bring the career curtain down at the close of last year, with the … Continue reading Joni Mitchell: A celebration